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Ethnographic Museum "Regole of Ampezzo"
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primo piano
First floor. Click on the clickable areas of the map to visualize the contents of the different sections.

 

 

piano ingresso Entrance floor

 

 

piano seminterrato Basement

 

Mountain pastures
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In spring, all the Regolieri had to take part in “pasture clearing”, or else they would be expelled from the Regola. The dead branches gathered on the pastures were used as firewood in the shepherd's hut.

Sheep, which had been grazing near the homes since mid March, were the first to leave the shed. As snow melted away, the flock, ròdol, was herded up to summer pastures.
Dry sheep, fédes da grìes, would spend the summer on the high altitude pastures, ra mònte, of Fòses and Traenànzes. The shepherd had the right to keep a dairy sheep , malgòna, for himself.

Each pastureland, mònte, was divided in parts, called prenşères, corresponding to a daily grazing portion. Every day the shepherd would move to a different prenşèra, so as to let grass grow again.
The high pasturelands on Fòses plateau, in the heart of the Natural Park of the Ampezzo Dolomites, are still being used as sheep pasture by the High Regola of Lareto.

The dairy sheep flock, fédes da làte, would graze on the meadows around the fedères, high mountain cottages where the shepherd could gather and milk the sheep.
Cows and calves would remain in the sheds longer, until the grass had grown higher and meadows were green. On the days before 13th June, St. Antony's Day, the animals would set for the summer pastures: bullocks, oxen, and horses, i.e. all the animals which need not be milked were driven to Ra Stua and Fedèra, while dairy cattle would graze at lower altitudes, on the albèrghe, the meadows around the herdsmen's dwellings, the brìtes.

Brìtes were homes to:
- the herdsman and his helper, who herded the cattle to pasture and looked after the sick/diseased animals;
- ra britères, the women in charge of milking the animals and cooking;
- the mìštro and his helper, şonşeduó, in charge of processing milk.

Cows were milked twice a day and once a month, their owners would collect butter and cheese in proportion to the milk produced by their animals.
Nowadays, the brìtes, herdsmen's dwellings of Pezié de Parù and Lariéto are still intended for this use.